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Why viewing open homes in the rain could be the smartest way to go

Why viewing open homes in the rain could be the smartest way to go
Debbie Oliver
/ Categories: News

Chances are, if you are out and about house hunting this winter on the open homes trail, you’ll be doing it on a wet, blustery Northland day that finds you dodging in and out of rain showers and unfamiliar dwellings in pursuit of your piece of Northland paradise.

 

Believe it or not, rainy weather is actually the perfect time to be property viewing in Northland. Your prospective dream home or business investment will reveal hidden secrets during precipitation, things you may have never known existed if you had been viewing the property on a fine day.

 

Whether you are looking for a prime piece of real estate around Whangarei, a run-down potential ‘do up’ or a coastal property somewhere along the stunning Northland coastline, it’s possible you may be doing it in the rain. And while it may be uncomfortable, soggy and even a bit chilly at times, have patience! This is when you will see exactly what is going on underneath that interesting exterior.

 

Take advantage of a rainstorm to check your potential new property

As the Japanese proverb says, ‘the heaviest rains fall on the house that leaks the most’. This is so true in Northland. While many of our homes are modern, insulated and leak free, there are also many that have seen better days and could do with big renovations.   A rainy day is an excellent chance to see at a glance exactly how your prospective business premise or dream home is faring in our unpredictable Northland climate. 

 

This is the time to check for leaks and drips and from where a bitter wind is blowing. You’ll soon be able to see where rain is coming into the dwelling.  Check for insulation in the floors, walls and roof, windows and doors that can be left open for ventilation, heaters and ceiling fans. Most importantly in our balmy, subtropical climate, you’ll be able to see where the sheltered, sunny outdoor wining and dining areas could be for those long summer or winter evenings outside.

 

Check if the house is north facing to get maximum advantage of the day’s sunrays as the southern side is generally the coldest, dampest side of the house. Research has shown that a family of four can use as many as 19 litres of water every 24 hours for normal household chores. That is a lot of water vapour to get rid of and if the house is not properly vented, then it could lead to damp and mildew. Check if there are windows that can stay open in the rain and proper insulation and ventilation, avoiding the south facing rooms getting mouldy, cold and damp.

 

Open home or real estate viewing in fine weather

Can anything be a better than a day out house hunting for coastal properties or real estate in Whangarei on a fine, sunny Northland day?  The breath-taking coastal and farmland scenery, edgy urban landscapes and quiet suburban streets sparkle under the Northland sun and remind us of why we have chosen to live in this wonderful part of the country.

 

I’ve lived and worked in real estate in Northland all my life and there’s nowhere else in the world I’d rather be.  We are so lucky to be living in one of the most beautiful parts of the country and I pride myself on helping Northlanders (and those wanting to become a Northlander) achieve their real estate goals and find their dream home or investment property.

 

Contact me if you’d like help buying a new home in Northland.  I will work with you to purchase your dream home in the rain or sun, you can relax and know that I genuinely care about my clients and customers and will do my utmost best to make your purchase of your dream home as smooth and hassle free as possible. With the properties that I show, you can be sure there’s nothing to hide. That’s why I’ll hold open homes in all weather conditions:  I’ll even provide the umbrellas!

 

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Debbie OliverDebbie Oliver

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